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Tag Archives: masculine noun

ano

 

AÑO is the fifty-fourth most common word in the Spanish language.

AÑO is a masculine noun, linked into the English word, annual, and anniversary, amongst others; in other words, something related to the English word year.

Indeed, the word AÑO means “year”.

One of the first idiomatic phrases that Spanish students learn is “tengo…años“. This is translated into English as “I am…years old” whereas the Spanish is literally saying “I have … years”.

This brings me to the question of the importance of accents in Spanish. If a ten year old says, or writes, “tengo … anos” i.e. without the tilde (the accent on the n), he or she is saying that he or she has, not to put too fine a point on it, ten anuses ( or should that be ani?). Moral of the story – beware the accent!

Here are a couple of examples of the use of año

1. As above – tengo veinticinco años – I am 25 years old

2. El año próximo voy a ir a España Next year I am going to go to Spain.

The moral of the story here then is to be very careful with your accents!  AÑO is the fifty-fourth most frequently used word in Spanish.

 

 

sobre

Sobre is the forty seventh most common word in the Spanish Language.

This lively two-syllable is both a masculine noun and a preposition. My Collins Spanish -English dictionary gives the following key meanings of the word.

Sobre as a masculine noun means an “envelope”

Sobre as a preposition means “on”.

It is clear though that most of the use of sobre will be with its meaning of “on”.

Here is an example of each of the meanings.

¿Dónde está el sobre? – where is the envelope? Sobre, therefore, is being used as as a masculine noun.

Sobre la mesa – on the table    In this case, sobre is being used as a preposition.

And here is a sentence, putting both of the previous examples of both the noun and the preposition into action. Such fun!

El sobre está sobre la mesa – The envelope is on the table

To conclude – sobre is the 47th most common word in the Spanish language. It doubles up as both a masculine noun and a preposition. Such are the varied lives led by these high frequency Spanish words!

 

PODER is the twenty sixth most common word in the Spanish language.

This really is a powerful word (sorry for those in the know the pun was intended). A real “must know”, a “sine qua non”; knowing this word, an irregular verb, is the real meat and drink of language learning.

Perhaps you can sense my fervour for this word through the prose, or my voice if you are listening to the podcast of this post. Once you start getting to grips with irregular verbs such as PODER and all its irregular parts in the different tenses, then you are beginning to make real progress.

As a top learning tip, I would make sure that you know all of the first persons (the I form) of this verb in all its various tenses and various irregular forms. If you need to help on then, then why not head over to www.verbix.com, a fantastic website that can help you out with all sorts of verb related bits and pieces.

PODER then is an irregular verb and, according to my dictionary, (the Collins English-Spanish dictionary) has some 15 or so shades of meaning. The best translation is “to can” (I know that “to can” sounds strange to English ears but it is the best way to remember it) or the more formal “to be able”.

PODER is also a noun. El poder (a masculine noun) means power.

So. let’s cut to the chase and look at straight forward use of this noun and verb.

No puedo venir – I cannot come (puedo is the first person singular present tense)

And now as a noun

el pueblo al poder – power to the people

Well that just about wraps up this post on the twenty sixth most frequent word in the Spanish language. PODER is very powerful and will give real power to your language learning elbow if you become intimate and up and personal with it!